WWF's Conservation Innovation Awards

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Investigating the weird, wonderful and sometimes freaky biodiversity of the Waikato: Engaging community, iwi and schools in biodiversity science.

I propose to engage the Waikato community, iwi and school groups to undertake a series of arthropod biodiversity bioblitz's in significant natural ecosystems, using DNA barcoding to identify the community composition of species, their distributions, and recruitment occurring in the region.

The key focus of this project is engagement. This project will engender a greater appreciation and association with the endemic biodiversity found in some of our stunning ecosystems. A part of this project will involve guided educational exploration days to be held for community volunteers, educators and school groups, at a selection of forested and freshwater reserves. The results, in the form of taxonomic biodiversity trees and associated terrestrial and 360 degree aerial photography, will be made publicly available, presented online and during live presentations.

What conservation problem are you trying to solve?

The connection, perception, appreciation and understanding our significant natural ecosystem has suffered from a lack of attention in recent years. Very little is known about the invertebrate biodiversity associated with our significant natural ecosystems, the habitat and vegetation affinities of individual species, nor their dispersal, recruitment and distribution across our region. 


Invertebrate community studies, necessary for restoration of novel and indigenous ecosystems, are complicated and limited by traditional methods of identification which can often only identify mature females. In terms of assessing community structure, this has rendered studies of community dynamics at fine resolution nigh impossible and expensive.

How are you going to solve this conservation problem?

As kaitiaki it is important that we take care of our taonga and develop a better appreciation of the mauri associated with some of our precious natural ecosystems in the Waikato.

This project would provide an opportunity for educational groups and the broader community to be involved in a series of Bioblitz open days, where volunteers will assist members of the scientific community in exploring and collecting representative samples of the weird and wonderful, but poorly understood invertebrate fauna to be found in our local terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. The results from the bioblitz studies will subsequently be reported back to the community through a variety of media and live presentations.

What makes your idea new and unique?

I propose that this project is a game changer because using DNA barcodes asa means of identification is an internationally validated method. It can be used to assess and develop a better understanding of whole invertebrate communities.

Importantly this project provides our communities with a unique opportunity to bridge the gap between science, our taonga, and our communities. Afterall, the purpose of this opportunity is to engender a greater appreciation of the living world, trading beyond our own experiences. 

Who will use your idea, and how will they benefit?

The results from the research will be made publicly available as there is no commercial element to any of the research. This project will directly benefit: The community, Waikato Regional Council; Department of Conservation; University of Waikato; Waipa District Council; iwi. 

The formation of this project has engaged these groups in the discussion and planning phase: Nga tai o Kawhia Regional Management Committee; Maniapoto Iwi; Ngutunui Enviro School; Junior Naturalists Society; Hillcrest High School; Pirongia Te Araaro Kahu Restoration Society; Forest and Bird, Waikato.

Benefits include (1) Bioblitz's which involve community engagement across the region. (2) Educational resources; (3) Information which aids in restoration efforts for biodiversity conservation of disturbed sites.

What tasks or activities do you need investment for? How would you spend a $25,000 grant?

A grant from the WWF would support the costs associated with sampling and DNA barcoding a host of forested and freshwater ecosystems in our region. In order to get a good representative sample of an ecosystem requires a minimum of 3 individuals representative of each species. If we observe a high diversity in stable ecosystems it could be possible to assess 150+ species, requiring barcoding of up to 500 specimen per location. This grant would support two aspects of this study, firstly it would provide $3,000 toward the purchase of a flying camera unit which would provide us the opportunity to include 360 degree photography taken from each sampling site. Secondly, the remaining funds would be used to provide the expertise and associated costs to undertake the assessment of 1,050 specimen, representing 300-500 different species. This will be an incredible feat, a unique opportunity to engage a broad spectrum of our community, and is achievable within a 12 month period.

Are you a New Zealand citizen or resident?

YES

I have read and agree to the Crowdicity Terms of Use, the Conservation Innovation Awards 2017 Supplemental Terms and Conditions, and the Crowdicity Privacy Policy

YES

List five other ideas posted in the challenge that excite you. Why?

1. Hanging Gardens of New Zealand - The new wonder of the modern world.

 Why? This project has potential to compliment mobile invertebrate dispersal and recruitment.

2. Restoring the oceans abundance using seawater electrolysis - a marine conservation initiative.

Why? I would be interested to find out at what density these coils are recommended in order to effect a substantiated and significant benefit in the surrounding ecosystem

3. Swimming with E-coli

Why? Publicly accessible real-time data monitoring of freshwater streams, rivers and lakes has the potential to reduce the health risk to human and animal life. Identifying the worst culprit habitats would inform management practices toward the rehabilitation of those systems. 

 4. The Baleen Filter – Preventing Plastic Microfibres from entering our oceans 

Why? This project highlights a little discussed issue with household waste water that requires further thought and investigation. The application of a filter sounds like a reasonable proposition, however, I would like to know if they have a plan to address the need to remove and clean the filter on a regular basis, and whether the filter could pose a danger to the longevity of the machines functionality

5. Thermal Imaging to unmask what is in my backyard

Why? This non-invasive monitoring technique could provide valuable information about the concentration of trapping effort and eradication methods required from season to season.

 

How could you improve your idea?

This idea has been previously refined through an engagement process and will be overseen be a panel of advisors, including representatives from 

Nga tai o Kawhia Regional Management Committee

Ngutunui Enviro School

Canterbury Museum

Department of Conservation

Waikato Regional Council

Landcare Research

 

There is opportunity to further refine the project with regards to the best manner by which to present the results of the project with the community and make them easily accessible. This would involve consultation with educators and the input of IT gurus to aid in the design of a quality and accessible online platform.  

edited on Oct 11, 2017 by Nigel Binks

Megan Somerville Sep 28, 2017

Love the title!

I am not sure if you are already working with all of the groups listed in your proposal, but would be interested if iwi, as kaitiaki, informed the methodology of the project? How does / can matauranga Maori add another dimension to understanding the land and what lives in/on it.

Likewise with the participation of schools, will the project support sustained environmental learning? are you envisaging this project will enable teachers and students be able to build on the suggestions from resources such as this: http://www.doc.govt.nz/get-involved/conservat...ur-green-space/ ?

Hillcrest High and the community around it is culturally diverse. wondering if you will consider how to tap into this diversity when engaging the community?

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Nigel Binks Sep 28, 2017

Good evening Megan.
I will do my best to answer your queries in this space. This project idea is a pilot study which is directly associated with research which will be conducted by the University of Waikato over a total period of four years, beginning in 2018. Each of the groups I have listed has been involved in an intensive consultation phase and have provided valuable input toward sight selection criteria. Representatives from these organisations form a key panel of advisors which provide feedback and are consulted during this process.

I have been fortunate to work with the Nga Tai o Kawhia Regional Management Committee for the past two years while undertaking prior research in the Pirongia Forest Park. Following a presentation from me at their September committee hui, held at the Mokai Kainga Marae, I received their blessing and permission to further investigate and report on the little-known biodiversity associated with the surrounding ecological district.

This project will take place in the Kawhia/Raglan Ecological District and will seek to engage with the immediate community associated with the significant natural ecosystems in those areas. The link to the DOC green space initiative is an excellent resource, however we aim to explore invertebrates for which little is knowledge and our target taxa do not feature in DOC green space inititative - yet. This project would provide an opportunity for those individuals who wish to know more to join us for Bioblitz's and practical educational field trips. Subsequently we would report our findings and provide educational material about the areas biodiversity to the community and associated schools in order to develop a better understanding and appreciation as kaitiaki for our valuable taonga.

Primarily this is a scientific research project which seeks to bridge the gap between science, the community and education. Although our Waikato communities are culturally diverse, my focus is reporting to the community about natures diversity, rather than focusing upon the people themselves. From my perspective all peoples associated with the surveyed ecosystems would be provided with the same opportunities to engage and learn from this unique experience.

Thank you for your thoughts.

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Megan Somerville Sep 28, 2017

Ngā mihi for our thoughtful response. I would encourage you to think about how you report back to communities as the 'how' you report hugely influences 'who' in a community you reach.

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Nigel Binks Sep 29, 2017

I absolutely agree. One of our methods would be to provide a free online resource in conjunction with the Waikato Regional Council which depicts the biodiversity observed across the region, and the diversity associated with local reserves. My understanding of the Bright Ideas for Nature award is such that we will have an opportunity to develop a best approach method for effectively translating and communicating the results of our findings.

I personally enjoy presenting and discussing ecological community dynamics with groups, however, I am quick to acknowledge that each audience is very different to the last. Ultimately, the aim of this project is to improve our understanding and appreciation for what remains in our remnant and beautiful ecosystems.

The more support we can gather, the broader and more inclusive our focus can be.

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View all replies (3)

Yanbin Deng Oct 1, 2017

A great young scientist project, the finding will be interested in identifying invertebrate biodiversity nature.

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Nigel Binks Oct 4, 2017

Thank you Yanbin, it's a big enough project that we should be able to have multiple research students conducting scientific studies simultaneously, which means we can maximise the efficiency of the bioblitz's.

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Heather Binks Oct 1, 2017

What an awesome idea to get the next generation involved and informed while researching and expanding our knowledge of our local environment.

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Pauldu Oct 1, 2017

This is a perfect opportunity to collaborate with the wider community/agencies and establish awareness that biological communities are not just vertebrate exclusive. We need to identify what is in our diminishing indigenous ecosystems before it is too late. This project also has potential to address biosecurity related issues and how exotic arthropods influence native taxa.

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Yanbin Deng Oct 2, 2017

How do you update your data? What can you make your methodology to be practically used by communities?

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Nigel Binks Oct 2, 2017

Thank you for your questions. All the data collected during the bioblitz surveys will be compiled into a central repository and all the DNA barcoding results are made available via the Barcode of Life datasystem (www.boldsystems.org). These key repositories can be regularly updated and used for analyses and comparison.
In association with the Waikato Regional Council, the compiled species inventory and associated specimen information will be transformed into a GIS layer and the ecosystem diversity observed can be directly relayed back to the associated communities via an online webpage educational resource.
The nature of bioblitz's is such that their aim is to determine what lives in each ecosystem, therefore this bioblitz project will use a range of methods to obtain a diverse range of taxa during specific time frames which should correspond to the greatest level of arthropod activity during summer months (2 hours after sunset and sunrise). A follow-up study will then use standardised collection methods to determine which sampling methods are most effective for collecting a representative sample of that biodiversity. Once we establish which methods obtain the most complete samples we can establish standardised collection methods which the local community can implore to collect samples from ecosystems and areas beyond the scope of this project.

I hope that addresses your queries. Thank you for taking the time to be involved.

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Murray Ings Oct 2, 2017

Good luck with this Nigel. I know that the work you are putting into this is important to try to prove a eco system balance.

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Ian McDonald Oct 2, 2017

A very interesting and timely project that will add to knowledge gaps in our understanding of our native invertebrate fauna

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Clare St Pierre Oct 2, 2017

I really loved your presentation to our group and realise that we don't know much about our native spiders. The way you link spiders to habitat and then landuse etc brought to life the importance of taking account even of this almost invisible class of biodiversity. Your use of DNA analysis is also pretty exciting so hope your get funded!

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Becky Wilson Oct 2, 2017

The idea has been progressed to the next milestone

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Heather-anne Lang Oct 2, 2017

A great idea to find out more about the crawlies which get such a bad rap. So happy to see schools and iwi to be involved. Good luck.

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Joseph Devlin Oct 2, 2017

Hey Nigel this is a great idea, I'm impressed to see the range and depth of planning that has been done to sample the habitat with as little disruption to the eco system as possible. I'm interested to find out more about how the data will or could be presented to the public at the end especially to students with non academic backgrounds or those with different learning styles. You may already have some ideas here ? Big smiles - Joseph Devlin

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Nigel Binks Oct 2, 2017

Hi Joseph, thanks for the feedback and addressing those questions. One of the ways I have approached my engagement with primary level students is to focus on what they see in front of their eyes. Recently I addressed this issue for the sake of my own presentations, of how to engage kids and adults from a range of disciplines and backgrounds, without losing their attention.

Charismatic cute and cuddly creatures are the usual way to appeal to an audience, but I prefer to use the creepy, weird and sometimes scary creatures. If it's creepy or weird the audience will react, regardless of the level of revulsion the image conjures in their minds. In terms of spiders, people always have a story to tell as to why they love or hate them, and that response has been the trigger for discussion and an opportunity to instigate a teachable moment. During presentations I like to bring along preserved specimen encased in clear resin, a safe and effective way to safely hold and observe what you can't normally. In 2016 SONY NZ provided sponsorship of my research photography and in July 2017 I initiated a kickstarter crowdfunding project titled: Support research & presentation of NZ's diverse spider fauna. This was a great success and raised 200% of the goal with the support of 60 contributors. This crowdfunding project raised funds in order to develop and print a photo gallery book of species titled "Spiders of the Waikato", and a selection of spider wildlife images to glass. These have been an excellent visual supplement for education and presentation.

Wildlife photography taken during the course of the bioblitz's can be made available online for public access. The flying camera unit will provide 360 degree photos centralised within the bioblitz sampling locations. It is my intent to contribute these images as an online resource for the public to explore, enabling them to pan 360 degrees and observe the bioblitz habitats online. These 360 degree shots will be taken at different heights above the ground so that the sub canopy and canopy layers can be observed. Google maps is a great resource but very few images focus on ground-level imagery within ecosystems away from the roads.

For those who are more practically minded, the bioblitz's will provide a great opportunity to get out and explore the environment, learn from experience, and be involved in this community focused project.

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Sarah Hollows Oct 2, 2017

I love how involving the next generation in this, teaching them about different spider families, and the role they play in our wider eco system!

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Joe McCarter Oct 3, 2017

Nice idea Nigel and a critical gap to be filled.

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Nigel Binks Oct 3, 2017

This project would allow the science community to produce informative reports for the community upon the biodiversity analysis of each individual ecoblitz location. They would include a taxonomy list, image library, neighbour-joining biodiversity tree, and comparisons with the other analysed bioblitz locations.

The whole project would move forward through collaborative efforts because each ecoblitz will establish a species inventory and DNA barcode library for itself, but a shared repository between ecoblitz locations which allow for concurrent identifications within the complete collection of ecosystems.

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Daniel Lumb Oct 3, 2017

Great work Nige!! A very interesting project, and good to see the community engaging also :)

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Nigel Binks Oct 4, 2017

Thanks Daniel, here's hoping we can ignite the imagination of the current, next and future generations with some fun and educational science.

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Daniel Howie Oct 3, 2017

A well thought out project Nige. One which I look forward to contributing to. The applications for the data produced by this project are endless. But, more importantly, the ability to engage and share information with the community is what really sets this project apart.

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Nigel Binks Oct 4, 2017

Thank you for your feedback Daniel. I think this is an ideal opportunity to set the facts straight - did you know that the Waikato is considered relatively species poor?! As a researcher at the University of Waikato, I say we address this bias hand-in-hand as a community, and at least develop an accurate picture and understanding of what is living and being protected within our significant natural areas.

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Anthea Kivell Oct 4, 2017

Really excited about the research undertaken in this area. It is of huge importance to understanding the environment in which we all live.

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Nigel Binks Oct 4, 2017

Thank you Anthea. I love hearing that the idea excites others also.

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Ian Duggan Oct 4, 2017

A major factor that reduces the chances of invertebrates being a focus of conservation efforts relative to vertebrates is the lack of familiarity by the public of them. This project will help the community become engaged with arthropods, which I believe will flow on to their appreciation of a broader range of invertebrates. I see this as being a major positive.

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Nigel Binks Oct 8, 2017

Thank you Ian for your comment. Personally I was surprised to learn that in 2017 our understanding and knowledge in the field of biodiversity is still poorly understood. This project would provide legitimate opportunities to involve the broader community and engender a greater understanding and appreciation of the value our natural heritage has.

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Susan McCurdy Oct 4, 2017

This sounds like a fun and interesting idea. I have been to previous Bioblitz events and feel that this would be an exciting opportunity to use in that context. It is great to support a University of Waikato initiative that will eventually include undergraduate placement students. We know so little about certain aspects of our local environment that this will make a significant contribution.

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Nigel Binks Oct 8, 2017

Thank you Susan, the University of Waikato is an excellent institution to be affiliated with. The research aspect of this project would allow for the inclusion of a range of student projects and a broad range of studies to be conducted which would serve to develop our understanding and appreciation of our local environment.

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Simon Stewart Oct 4, 2017

Nice work Nigel! I'm excited to see work that is bridging the aquatic-terrestrial interface. Intuitively we know that streams are strongly connected to their surrounding terrestrial habitat but showing this habitat connectivity for the 'creepy-crawlies' will be great for vindicating riparian management efforts.
Is the drone camera to be used solely for community engagement or will it also assist the research?

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Nigel Binks Oct 8, 2017

Hi Simon, thanks for your feedback. The aquatic-terrestrial interface is poorly understood but is a critical exchange in energy between aquatic organisms and the terrestrial realm and requires investigation. The flying camera would be used to provide the public with 3D imagery in hard to reach ecosystems, at different heights in the canopy. This imagery would be used to compliment the science and to depict the distribution of the biodiversity though the development of an online, publicly accessible resource.

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Clare St Pierre Oct 5, 2017

Excited to see this has been progressed to the next milestone. Go Nigel!

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Kevin Collier Oct 6, 2017

Interesting project with great school and community group engagement - important to inspire young minds and reconnect them with nature. Combination of neighbourhood survey and DNA should motivate people to take interest

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Nigel Binks Oct 8, 2017

Thank you Kevin, I absolutely agree. This project has the potential to inspire a range of ages, through primary to high school, and with all ages in the broader public sector.

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HanG Oct 7, 2017

I would love to get my students involved with this. I think it would bring Biology to life and get kids inspired!

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Nigel Binks Oct 8, 2017

Hi Hannah, that would be amazing. Always keen to engage and involve students with this program of biodiversity investigation.

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Mike Slug Oct 8, 2017

New Zealand needs this type of work. Good luck

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Michael Denning-Kemp Oct 8, 2017

Great project Nigel. I hope it gets the funding it needs to get it off the ground

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Nick Bryant Oct 8, 2017

This would be awesome for our up and coming scientists. Im a bio teacher and these opportunities are rare.

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Nigel Binks Oct 8, 2017

It would be excellent to have your students involved. I'd be happy to discuss further.

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Hannah Lee Oct 8, 2017

Great idea! Can't wait to see how this one progress.

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Suzanne Ings Oct 8, 2017

This project is well worth supporting.

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Amy Patrick Oct 8, 2017

This is such a great project, the work you do is so informative and I love that the main objective is to always have the infomation easily accessible to the public. As a high school biology teacher I think it would be great to have some more information available to our students about our local ecosystems and more relevant examples for them than the generic ones found in textbooks. The use of DNA barcoding would also be a great way to show students that although we often study genetics and ecology as separate topics in class, in reality the concepts that they learn are used together in the field.

The Bioblitz programs would also be a great way to get students who are really keen on science and in particular biology a chance to see what oppertuities are available to them as scientists. The chance to collect samples in the field and have the data used for scientific purposes is a fantastic oppertunity for any individual. Im sure with all of the amazing oppertunities that are available through this project and Nigel's vast amount of scientific knowledge we could have really meaningful community engagement (with people of all ages) and hopfully have the next generation aspiring to be scientists and pass on the valuable knowledge that they have learned.

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Ruud Kleinpaste Oct 9, 2017

Hi Nigel
Projects like this are music to my ears. This kind of engagement is valid for all age groups of students; the technology you propose is great for secondary schools.
Its encouraging to see teachers reacting to your ideas as it often is really hard to get into cross-curricular projects in High Schools, due to the pressures of relentless assessments, time restraints and those modern systems of teaching.
To use the Environment (biodiversity, Science, etc) as a CONTEXT for education is absolutely the way to go; we're seeing this in our Cape to City projects (Hawkes Bay) too, where mini bioblitzes are done in primary schools... just to start the process off.

One aspect that you may want to think about is support for the teachers that want to be part of this gig; especially teachers that may not be very familiar with the wonderful world of invertebrates.
Create confidence, skills and "Nature-Literacy"
and then tell the stories!

I'm with you Nigel! I'm with you all the way!

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Nigel Binks Oct 9, 2017

Wow! Hi Ruud, I'm so stoked to receive your input. I absolutely agree, if we can engage with the teachers directly and inspire them, as we hope to with the younger generations, then their potential ability to share the knowledge and instil a greater appreciation of our biologically diverse ecosystems would certainly benefit from this opportunity to develop greater confidence and understanding firsthand. With tis thought in mind we could certainly accommodate a bioblitz or open days specifically for educators who would be interested in improving their nature-literacy and hearing the stories of the ancestors and fauna of the area. This would be a fantastic opportunity for iwi and groups directly associated with particular ecosystems to share their knowledge as kaitiaki.

I've read about the Cape to City projects and love the work that's being undertaken there. The DNA barcoding aspect of my science enables me to investigate dispersal, species distributions and recruitment, regardless of individual physical appearance (morpho-plasticity, sexual-dimorphism etc)
which is a game change in my mind. There are so few full-time professional taxonomists in New Zealand but with the engagement of those that are, barcoding provides us with an engaging method by which the education sector and our communities can directly contribute to science and a broader understanding.

What I am proposing to do here would also be complimented by a four-year programme I'm instigating at the University of Waikato titled: Investigating Terrestrial Arthropod Communities as Potential Indicators for the Assessment of Terrestrial Ecosystems in Relation to Ecosystem Type, Edge Effects and Anthropogenic Influences.

I'd be keen to discuss futher. I can be found on instagram, twitter and facebook @SpideGuyNige

Great to hear from you.

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Nigel Bell Oct 10, 2017

Really great to see what I'm sure will be fascinating molecular biology insights being communicated directly to the public. Cool science meets cool comms.

As a volunteer at one of the Waikato peat lakes which has been predator fenced I wonder if there is any possibility of doing an invertebrate community comparison between the margins of adjoining fenced/ non-fenced lakes? Given some of these areas have been fenced for only a couple of years perhaps there won't be many differences yet but the data may act as a benchmark for future, similar studies? It would be really interesting to know what impacts (if any) our volunteer efforts may be having on invertebrate communities.

Best of luck, it would be really exciting to see this initiative progress.

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Ruud Kleinpaste Oct 10, 2017

Great comment; Great suggestion.
Now we're talking!
Looks like it takes two Nigels to get this going...
Rotopiko has a heap of student activity as well and what you're doing now is connect the various schools and get them to compare the Biodiversity components.
Linking teachers and linking the students, AND doing some meaningful research.
I'm firmly believing that this is the way our education system should be heading: True Inquiry Learning

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Nigel Binks Oct 10, 2017

Hi Ruud, Nigel Bell makes a great point and yes indeed I too would appreciate the opportunity to explore and compare the differences in community composition that may result from predator proof fencing. I can tell you from my own experience and observations that mammalian rodents wreak havoc and predate on many key invertebrate taxa. Given the Ohaupo/Waipa area has quite the collection of peat lakes, all within similar proximity to Mt Prirongia and the forest park (source populations), there is a good chance that over time species will be recruited or disperse to these novel and restored ecosystems. This project would provide an excellent opportunity to undertake a bioblitz around these lakes and establish a baseline of present day biodiversity data so that we can make greater assessments of the community composition in the future, by engaging the local community, restoration groups and students in this inquiry learning with the intent to improve the nature literacy of our region.

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Nigel Binks Oct 10, 2017

Hi Nigel, great to receive your comments. Yes indeed, making comparisons between comparative ecosystems which have or have not yet been fenced and under a pest management regime would provide a valuable comparison, and would be an ideal research focus to associate with the Waipa peat lakes. The Waipa district is very engaged with restoration activities and has a number of community groups active in the area who would be interested in being involved and would therefore be a prime candidate for microblitz's such as those I've proposed. Did you by chance see the article about myself and my research focus in the most recent Waipa Community News?

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Nigel Bell Oct 10, 2017

Yes indeed I did see your article, it was a nice highlight to come across unexpectedly.

Ruud is a wise man, he knows there can never be too many Nigel's! I wonder if we could get the Latta one involved on the people communication side? :-)

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View all replies (4)

Adrian Pittari Oct 10, 2017

This is a great project idea and there is a lot of scope to engage the local community as well as produce useful scientific findings.

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Joanne Jackson Oct 12, 2017

Are you planning to use real-time DNA testing to identify different species? And how will you show the data in an easily accessible and understandable format?

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Nigel Binks Oct 12, 2017

Hi Joanne, we don't intend to use real-time DNA testing as it has not been developed in NZ for the extraction of the COI gene from invertebrate organisms. Rather all the DNA barcoding that is undertaken as a part of my research and during this project, contributes to the International Barcode of Life project (http://www.barcodeoflife.org/). Also in association with Guelph University in Canada we will be bringing the LifeScanner kits to New Zealand in 2018 (http://www.lifescanner.net/) which will enable individuals to collect a subset of samples themselves, form any location in the region. Genetic information gathered in this way is identified and the location and information is uploaded to the application which can be downloaded to each individuals cell.

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Nick Kemp Oct 15, 2017

I've got kids who would love this! Awesome :)

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Mark Black Oct 15, 2017

This is an excellent and important opportunity for our community to benefit while expanding an important and often overlooked aspect of conservation

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Tanticle Oct 15, 2017

This project would be an awesome opportunity to learn more about our unknown biodiversity associated with conservation sites and reserves

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Ross Oct 15, 2017

My kids love bugs and would love to know more about our local environment, we'd be keen to be involved

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Jared Dixon Oct 15, 2017

Me and my whanau love this Idea. Would be keen to be involved in this

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