WWF's Conservation Innovation Awards

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Wild about NZ Wildlife

Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust have been involved in the breeding of native species like Yellow Crowned Kakariki, Giant Weta, to be released back into the wild.

The Predator Free NZ 2050 initiative will create a huge demand on the release of native species in those newly created predator free areas. For this reason we designed a modular system for relocatable aviaries. Those aviaries are suitable to release native species in the preferred area and will increase the success of the release programme.

The Department of Conservation has found that releasing birds in new areas are more successful by having the birds stay on site, in aviaries for a few weeks, after the release they will still be fed for a while until the birds are settled into their new area.

This is called the 'soft-release' method.

To bring back native species like Kakariki (that are unlikely to return without re-introduction) is the reward for many projects after all the hard work done to reach a predator free status. 

What conservation problem are you trying to solve?

The demand on wild species (genes) will rapidly grow and we are depending on wild stock on offshore sanctuaries protected by the Captive Management of Wildlife Act. This Act acknowledged (1.5 principles,6) that collection of animals for ex situ programmes must not be allowed to threaten eco systems or in situ populations. The survival of those vulnerable species is also threatened if the predator free status on those islands is breached. New populations on the mainland are crucial for NZ. 

How are you going to solve this conservation problem?

To breed new populations in captive management with the collection of limited numbers of wild species, will fit the Wildlife Act to protect healthy populations on those sanctuaries. The release and re-introduction of native endangered species into predator free areas on the mainland will be vital for their survival and spread the risk.The re-locatable housing will save cost for other projects, increasing the survival rate and will open study and research opportunities.

The modular design is easily assembled, transported and re-located. Durable materials will guarantee a long life expectancy.The unique design has also options to adapt the housing for winter and summer conditions to solve problems with sunlight and shelter. The living space and flight-path can also be adjusted for the particular specie inside.To protect the gene pool, partnerships have been formed with other breeding facilities.   

What makes your idea new and unique?

The re-locatable and modular concept will reduce cost for other projects as they will only need the aviaries temporary. The cost savings will attract and inspire more projects that are working on the ultimate goal to (re)introduce native species like Kakariki in their project, but are working with a limited budget. By using the modular system it will be easier to adept to local conditions and provides opportunities to observe and study, to make sure the reintroduction will be a success.

Who will use your idea, and how will they benefit?

We will provide the re-locatable aviaries to DOC approved projects. It will reduce cost and time as the projects don't have to build permanent aviaries on site and have a greater chance of success to establish a healthy population of birds that will grow overtime. 

 

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What tasks or activities do you need investment for? How would you spend a $25,000 grant?

The grant will be used to purchase materials to build the first re-locatable modular aviaries.

Are you a New Zealand citizen or resident?

YES

I have read and agree to the Crowdicity Terms of Use, the Conservation Innovation Awards 2016 Supplemental Terms and Conditions, and the Crowdicity Community Guidelines

YES

List five other ideas posted in the challenge that excite you. Why?

The Forest Bridge Trust, great to involve the next generation

Christopher Wingate, extremely important that env. work is protected from all levels

Inge Bolt and Celvin Nature Internet, new technologies are vital for success

Lizard Tales, creating awareness regarding lizards and what we can learn from smaller areas

How could you improve your idea?

Learning from the feedback and e-mails we are realizing that the aviaries needs to be easy to transport (North Island).

Stress for the birds was mentioned several times and we are well aware that this is important. However we are looking at a modication of the design (feeding area).

The survey we initiated under projects in the top of the South Island, key findings will be added with more info from new incoming projects

edited on Oct 12, 2016 by Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust

Kathryn Richards Oct 3, 2016

A very special place and appreciate their willingness to share it with the kiwi conservation club

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 5, 2016

Thank you for your support, we had a great day with the Kiwi Conservation Kids and hope to see your group back one day.

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KMCanimals Oct 3, 2016

This organization has been part of conservation in New Zealand for over 20 years, but they are constantly evolving and coming up with new ideas. I have never met any group more committed to wildlife restoration.

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Inge Bolt Oct 5, 2016

There are so many groups working tirelessly almost totally as volunteers throughout the country. I am part of Thames Coast Kiwi Care and we have a new idea too....see "E.T find kiwi" entry. We are all in it for the right reasons.

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 5, 2016

Thank you for your inspirational comment.

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 5, 2016

Thank you for your inspirational comment.

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View all replies (3)

Inge Bolt Oct 5, 2016

THere have been a few fence/ enclosure ideas floating around. One of the potential problems encountered with enclosures is the control of disease. Often following translocation the animals are more stressed and therefore more susceptible to diseases and often reactivate latent disease. This may want to be considered in your design.

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 5, 2016

Thank you for your comment. Before birds are released they will be screened for diseases but avoiding stress is very important that's why the soft release programmes are more successful. The modular aviary system can be easily divided in sections to introduce the new birds to each other.
There are two major advantages to soft release programmes (aviaries on release site);
1. they can familiarize themselves with the new surrounding so they will stay there.
2. while they are exploring their new area the birds can still go back to the aviaries to get extra food while they are adapting to the diet in the wild.

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Christopher Wingate Oct 5, 2016

You have my total support

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 7, 2016

thank you for your support

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les kelly Oct 6, 2016

Great idea as predatorfreenz gathers pace and more and more areas are cleared of predators we are going to require native species to populate these areas allowing for greater genetic viability. A vital project fro the future of New Zealands native wildlife. les Kelly founder predatorfreenz

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 7, 2016

Hi Les, a predator free New Zealand, with an abundance of native wildlife, is it a dream or can it be a reality? Together we can make a difference for the next generation to come. Thank you for your comment.

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Fiona Edwards Oct 7, 2016

Hi - I'm a Conservation Ambassador - I love that the aviary is portable and modular and can be used throughout New Zealand to aid in the relocation of bird species. Can you give the judging panel some idea of the potential demand and use of these aviaries? Thanks

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 7, 2016

Hi Fiona, we initianated releases from our breeding facilities into other projects after a survey in 2015 by our Trust find out the interest in the top of the South Island. Six projects in the Marlborough/Nelson area are keen for species but only of those projects is well funded and was able to build there own enclosure.
With the PFNZ 2050 goals we forsee a growing demand for species to release into new predator free projects in NZ. This will add extra cost to those groups involved and the funding pools are already under pressure. We believe that a one off investment in the new concept for aviaries will serve many projects so their funding can go further into predator free areas. Not to forget that the temporarely set up has huge benefits for the success and survival of the release species.
Thank you for your very interesting question.

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Fiona Edwards Oct 8, 2016

In your proposal above I think you should include the key findings of your survey to show the level of interest in your aviary. Good luck

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 8, 2016

Answer at the top. Thank you.

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View all replies (3)

Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 8, 2016

This is a response to Fiona's question about the outcome of the survey we've done in 2015 under six projects that were working on getting their area predator free.
Thank you Fiona, good point again. I am not able to edit our proposal but will include key findings in this reply. The survey identified some real benefits for our Trust and other projects.
The survey asked about the need for captive bred species. Findings were as follow;
- the re-locatable, modular aviaries will save cost on the projects as most of us are working within limited budgets.
- the exchange of experience from our Trust with DOC and other projects but also the experience from those who are involved in the release area. As a Trust we are not only interested in the breeding of species but also want to put in our best effort to make sure the Kakariki will have the best chance to establish themselves in the area allocated to the release.
- All six projects contacted were keen to have captive bred species, particularly Kakariki. Which helps us to decide what species we should focus on.
We were inspired with the positive feedback and that we are all working on the ultimate goal, bringing back species so everyone can enjoy viewing them again!

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Fiona Edwards Oct 9, 2016

Thanks for your reply - I think there should be an edit button at the top of your page that will allow you to edit your application - if you have problems give WWF a call and they can help you out. Good luck with your application - it's an exciting project.

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Ian Montgomery Oct 10, 2016

Great respect for the work done a Tui, and the greater area. I have seen for myself the results of their efforts and it is spectacular.

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 12, 2016

Hi Ian, thank you for your support.

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Steffan Browning Oct 10, 2016

I can see that this project will be well considered following the experience and skill I have seen with Tui Nature Reserve's aviaries on site and predator work including specially trained dogs for hunting out rodents/mustelids. I met the founding family when they were Supreme Award winners a few years back at the Marlborough Environment Awards. http://www.tuinaturereserve.co.nz/

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 12, 2016

Hi Steffan, thank you for your support.

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Andy McKay Oct 10, 2016

Hi Wild about NZ Wildlife,

Ngā Uruora - Kāpiti Project Inc. has a project in the planning stages involving kākāriki that could really benefit from relocatable aviaries. I'll get in touch via email.

Cheers,

Andy

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Tui Nature Reserve Wildlife Trust Oct 12, 2016

We've received your email. Will get back to you as soon as possible.

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Jake Brookie Oct 11, 2016

Great idea! It will certainly cut down on the amount of money each project needs once the housing is completed. Having lived in Marlborough myself I know lots of groups who would use it!

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Jake Brookie Oct 11, 2016

Great idea! It will certainly cut down on the amount of money each project needs once the housing is completed. Having lived in Marlborough myself I know lots of groups who would use it!

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Christopher Wingate Oct 13, 2016

I am hoping to get your support to vote for Dr Maggie Evans who until I intervened only had 2 votes. Her work is critical science to help save critically endangered birds such as the Kakapo. Please take a look and lets all give her our support. We are all in this together. Cheers- https://wwf-nz.crowdicity.com/post/285779

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